Home of Grace (patterns in songwriting)

As I have mentioned in a previous post, every song is a story. A story includes a plot, characters, a climax, as well as ending, A song has a similar structure. We’ve talked about how the first verse should invite the listener in. The end of the first verse builds to the chorus, which is a recurring theme, but not the climax. The second verse tells more of the story, and gives way to a bridge in most cases. Some songs do not contain a bridge. Bridges are the norm in popular music, especially those that receive airplay on the radio.

Today I’d like to talk about the verse structure, or pattern.

In the song “Home of Grace”, the first two lines of verse one are:

No one’s sure what’s in store as we journey, how our choices shape our future and our hearts.

The second verse’s first two lines mirror the same sentiment, but clarifies it further:

If you could see up ahead around the corner, you might fail to find the courage to be brave.

The first verse, part b:

And it could be you, and it could be me, who learns to build a home of grace.

The second verse, part b:

But He sees you, and He sees me, and wants to build a home of grace.

It is interesting to note that the first verse in a song introduces an idea, and the second verse reaffirms it.

[clickandtweet handle=”” hashtag=”” related=”” layout=”” position=””]The last line of a verse should always be a powerful segue to the chorus.[/clickandtweet] Ideally, both verses should end similarly, and sometimes with the “hook”.

In this case “home of grace”.

We can talk about the chorus tomorrow, or a later date, and discuss just what a home of grace is all about.

 

©Cindy Palin All Rights Reserved

 

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